Do Book Bloggers Clickbait?

In one way or another, we´ve all been confronted with clickbait before. You know, that moment when you see an interesting headline and click the link, only to have discovered that the article has little to do with the headline? Yeah, that. That´s clickbait in all its glory.

 

 

As annoying clickbait is, there´s no denying that it works. It´s wrong, for sure, but that doesn´t stop it from happening. Because people want views- They want attention. Is that a crime? Well, to want attention isn´t a crime. You can hardly fault anyone who wants their work to be seen. It´s the fact that a false bait is deliberately used to achieve that goal that doesn´t sit well with many.

Lately, I´ve noticed an increase of people blaiming book bloggers of clickbaiting.

 

 

Can book bloggers clickbait? It´s possible. It wouldn´t surprise me if they did use this tactic to gain views. I can´t say I´ve seen a clickbait post by a book blogger, though. Not yet. Up until this point, it´s just people abusing the word clickbait for lack of a better term to describe their anger toward something they didn´t like. The word itself has become a popular insult in the book blog community.

But do book bloggers clickbait? They could but I think it´s highly unlikely that they are using this form of trickery. I´m not denying book blogger´s clickbait existence, I´m just saying it’s not as widespread as it is in online journalism. From what I´ve seen, the supposed clickbait blog posts ( from book bloggers ) were either misunderstood or in fact, understood but not accepted due to personal reasons. Or the book blogger post didn´t fit with the intellectual standards of others. It´s 2020. Words mildly confuse many book people.

 

 

Should there be a moment when a book blogger uses clickbait to gain attention… Well, I can´t say there´s any reason to go ape-shit over that. This is not me condoning clickbait in any way, shape, or form but it´s hardly worth getting the pitchforks out, wouldn´t you agree? It´s irritating, especially when you believe you´re about to read something you´re really really interested in. But not life-threatening. A reader/blog visitor has the opportunity to ignore the clickbait once they realize what´s happening.

Again, I´m not saying I´m pro clickbait when it comes to book bloggers. I very much disagree with this method when it´s done intentionally because I think it´s pointless.

And because I would hate to be called a click baiter myself I´m going to repeat the headline of this blog post and answer the question directly ( to clear up any confusion )

Do Book Bloggers Clickbait? Yes and no, but I´m leaning more toward no. There is a huge chance that book bloggers word their headliners incorrectly or can´t find a better way to come up with something eye-catchy that would fit their blog post. Misunderstandings happen every day. Did you hear that Karen and Ken? Shit happens.


What are your thoughts on book bloggers who use clickbait?

What are your thoughts on book bloggers who´ve been accused of click-baiting?

Have you ever been called a click baiter or accused another book blogger of click-baiting?

Let me know in the comments below. I´d love to chat. ❤


Thank you for reading this blog post. I truly appreciate it.

Hope you have a wonderful bookish day.

Much love,

The Art Of Giving Readers Power

Kind of a sinister title for a blog post, don´t you think? The Art Of Giving Readers Power– Sounds dark and highly controversial. Well, I can assure you this blog post won´t be dark but I can´t guarantee this will be a controversial free read. That will be for you, as a blog visitor or as a dedicated follower, to decide. Either way, I hope you enjoy this topic as it´s been something I´ve thought about for quite some time.

The Art Of Giving Readers Power

One would think that readers are silent, harmless human beings. They don´t have any sort of power because they´re the ones at the end of the bookish stick. Readers and book bloggers just read and sometimes write reviews.

 

 

Many have failed to acknowledge the fact that readers are actually the ones who hold the imaginary golden fountain pen when given permission. 

Now, I know what you´re thinking. And you´re partly right. But hey, it´s okay.  Just know that I´m going somewhere with this post. Back to the imaginary golden fountain pen wielding readers.

When I say ” when given permission” I mean when authors consciously include their readers in their writing process or ask questions on social media regarding a new idea.

Sometimes we see posts that look something like this:

“If I were to create a Hero who has a temper, would you see the Hero as someone who´s abusive?”

“I´m writing a book. What would you like to see happen in this book?” 

Of course, these questions could be seen as an act of kindness. Maybe an author wants to honor their dedicated fans by letting them pick a direction for the author´s story. Or perhaps an author has lost their writing mojo and needs a little inspiration. You know, that certain push to get things rolling again.  Whatever the reason- Authors are giving readers the opportunity to give their input. Is this is a smart move? I think it depends on from which side you´re seeing this. 

As an author, I can imagine that having a reader´s input is extremely helpful. 

As a reader, I can imagine the excitement when an author asks for an opinion.

All this looks like a win/win situation for everyone. That is… If one wishes to see it that way. Personally, I´ve tried seeing author questions on social media as something special but failed because I can´t stop wondering about the reasons. 

Why on God´s green earth would an author want a reader´s opinion? Have they run out of ideas? Isn´t that the worst thing an author could do? I mean, authors come up with a story and write it. Is it necessary to listen to the crowd? 

 

The Art Of Giving Readers Power

Authors are artists. Some are desperately trying to make a living off of writing. Some writers are barely keeping the dream alive while others are still trying to set foot in the business. Let´s not forget that it´s 2020. We´re living in a fragile time where it isn´t as easy to be a self-published author as it was 10 years ago. Readers certainly aren´t the people they used to be. Even feedback has changed. 

Book feedback in 2020 is either extremely good or extremely hurtful or the feedback doesn´t make a whole lot of sense. “I´m giving this book 2 stars because the ink on page 23 was smeared.” * sigh * Sadly, decent feedback isn´t as popular as the extremes, so they often go unnoticed or are immediately forgotten. 

There seem to be three main types of reading tribes. The ones who´re overly sensitive. The ones who´re fairly neutral. The ones we don´t know exist because they don´t hang around social media. A pissed off reader will do all they can to voice their disapproval. Negativity spreads faster than a wildfire in our community. 

Some authors tend to think they can´t afford to receive negative feedback as this would jeopardize book sales. They can´t take risks in an already hot environment. 

And that´s what it boils down to- Book sales. At the end of each day, the artist needs to make a living. In our world, it´s become easy to offend and trigger people with the simplest things. In order to prevent that from happening authors ask their fans/readers questions and therefore give power. It´s also about keeping the existing fanbase happy. 

I agree- Greater crimes have been committed. It´s also good to mention that not all self-published authors take this route. But isn´t it still sad that many do?  

 

“If I were to create a Hero who has a temper, would you see the Hero as someone who´s abusive?”

This is clearly an author who´s unsure about how their character will be perceived by their audience. The author is aware that abuse is a trigger topic but doesn´t see their character as someone who´s abusive. To avoid future backlash they decide to ask a reader, thus giving a reader power. Imagine the author has a little over 1000 online fans/followers. 100 are regularly active but only 20 react to an author´s question regarding their work.

20 readers say that the author´s Hero is, without a doubt, an abusive asshole ( without having met the character ). The author has two choices at that moment:

    Not create a character with a temper

    Make a note to include abuse as a trigger warning
You see, the power had already been unleashed the moment the feedback came in. 20 readers voiced their opinions. 20 readers were enough to change the course of a potential bestseller. 20 readers are enough to fill an author´s mind with doubt. 

And because this system had proven to be useful for an author they repeat it. Authors are then unaware that they´re allowing their readers to influence them. In the end, readers will feel empowered that they made a change for the better. A change that wasn´t necessarily better for everyone else. And the more this happens the more changes we´ll see with writers. 

Tough subject, right? 

Now, I know there are readers/fans and authors who´ll find this whole blog post appalling. There´s no doubt in my mind that someone is reading this right now, cursing me from the comfort of their homes, for even having entertained this absurd thought. And that´s fine. 

There are readers who prefer when they´re asked for their opinions to make their reading experiences as pleasant as possible. And, of course, there are authors who are all too willing to cater to their readers’ needs. Which is also fine. I might not agree with that, but okay. 

Still, one simple fact can´t be ignored- It´s all about money. It´s all about sales. The dream needs to stay alive. Whether it´s a question about characters, the plot, content warnings, or even about the blurb… I don´t think it´s the best idea to ask about these on public platforms for everyone to see and leave a comment. 

In my most humble opinion, I believe it´s important for authors to write about what feels right for them. Writers create stories for us to read. They challenge us with their thoughts and ideas and push boundaries. Authors aren´t out to destroy their readers’ wellbeing in any way. I have yet to encounter an author who wakes up in the morning and thinks “Today I´m going to fuck em all over so they end up needing life long therapy.” I don´t believe that. Just as much as I don´t believe any reader has a right to think that authors SHOULD write stories the way they want them to be. Creativity should be encouraged and celebrated. Not restricted. 

The Art Of Giving Readers Power

Reviews from readers are powerful on their own and should be enough to help an author make any adjustments ( if necessary ). Social media should be used to interact with fans/followers in a fun way. But that´s just my take on the topic. 

Nonetheless- I wish each and every author all the success in the world. 


What are your thoughts?

Do you think authors should ask for a reader´s opinion?

Have you seen an author ask similar questions on social media? 

Let me know in the comments below. I´d love to chat. ❤ 

 


Thank you for reading this blog post. I truly appreciate it.

Keep sharing the book love,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That´s Bookish Interesting- A Book Trigger Warning Site

When people ask me what´s it like to be in the book blog community I always give the same answer:

It´s interesting.

Because it is. Sure, it´s great fun to mingle with the book crowd and read/review and “research” on social media…  There´s always something new happening in the book blog universe. Just recently I stumbled upon something that caught my bookish attention. A site called Book Trigger Warnings.

Book Trigger Warnings is a site that´s dedicated to readers who´re looking for `safe` books to read.

Aah, okay.

 

 

In theory, not a bad idea. Some readers are sensitive / get triggered when reading potentially distressing material. Also, this idea offers insensitive readers, who´re looking for specific triggering elements, a way to feed their needs. The site can be seen as a win/win for both reader parties. 

In practice, though… This won´t be a simple thing to manage. Especially in a world where close to everything can be considered a trigger.

I won´t lie- I have mixed feelings about this site or any other site that promises `safe` options. I also don´t see the word `safe` anywhere near books. I can´t say I´ve met an author whose first priority was to write a safe book.

I accept a reader´s wish to want to read books that won´t trigger them. But where does the trigger list start and end?

Another concern of mine is: Most books already have trigger warnings. These are often included in online book descriptions ( either provided by a publisher or author ) or inside books. To include more trigger warnings would mean to reveal more information about the story. From my point of view, this means we´re moving further away from trigger warnings and closer toward spoilers. Not that I have anything against spoilers ( spoiler fan here ) but there are people who´ll literally threaten others if they mention more than what´s been printed on the backside of a book.

 

 

I can´t help but think about what book trigger warning sites do for authors / self-published authors ( or won´t do ). It´s no secret that most are already struggling with the trigger topic. Because trigger warnings influence sales.

 

  • Add no trigger warnings = Some readers could get triggered
  • Add a few warnings = Some readers will be triggered 
  • Add a generalized warning = Some readers will be triggered
  • Add any/all potential topic as a warning = Some readers will be triggered

 

A triggered reader will most likely leave a negative review. Negative reviews have the power to persuade potential buyers. So, an author is convinced they have to include trigger warnings for their books to not jeopardize their book sales. So far so good. But what if I told you that half of the triggered population isn´t genuinely triggered? Maybe they just don´t approve of certain elements in stories and demand to be warned?

The bottom line of all the points mentioned above is: Whatever happens, there will be triggered people. And there will be negative reviews. These can´t be avoided no matter what.

I applaud the people managing Book Trigger Warnings and wanting to provide safe reading experiences for their followers. It’s a genuine concept that targets a certain crowd. But I´m having a hard time wrapping my head around this topic.

We´re living in a world where people aren´t satisfied with walking away from something they don´t enjoy/like/approve of. The sole purpose of a book has always been to educate and entertain readers. By creating lists with `safe` reading options we´re helping readers stay in their comfort zones and unconsciously pressuring self-published authors to rethink their ideas for their future stories/to work harder on including the right trigger warnings.

Non-fiction can be a challenging genre for some readers. For readers who genuinely become emotionally distressed- I think the Book Trigger Warnings site could be helpful. It could also work the other way around for readers who live for emotional wreckage. But I truly believe many will misuse the site and that will take its toll on the publishing and self-publishing world.

Of course, I could be completely wrong about this topic. But then again, there is no right or wrong when it comes to trigger warnings. It all depends on the individual reader.

Despite my mixed feelings, I wish Book Trigger Warnings all the success, love, and chocolate cake in the world. May their site be as helpful as they hope it will be.

 


What are your thoughts? Feel free to leave a comment if you agree or disagree. ❤


Sending everyone lots of book love!

Have a wonderful day,

Why I Don´t Accept ARCs Anymore

ARCs – Advanced Readers Copies…

 

… are probably the second or third most popular reason why book bloggers become book bloggers – Because of the “free” books.

Aside from the fact that we get to read a book… What a privilege it is to be that person to read a book before it hits the market! Or to be that person who was asked by a publisher/author to read a book after it´s been published?

I remember my very first ARC. I can recall how excited I was to be able to read something before it was properly published. I even have the little note the author included.

 

My very first ARC

 

It was a special moment I´ll never forget. Fast forward a few years and I can say I´m not so hot on receiving ARCs anymore.

 

A little note before we continue…

KR2


 

 

Why I don´t

 

 

reason 1

Communication is key for those who want to communicate. I learned this the hard way. If you receive an ARC but have questions you can always contact the publisher/author, right? Yes, of course. Send emails. Hound them down on social media. There´s no guarantee they´ll reply, though. They´re busy people, you know? But God forbid you don´t read & review within two days after having received an ARC. Only THEN will a publisher/author contact you… To ask where the review is.

This wasn´t always the case. I´ve worked with wonderful publishers/authors before but every once in awhile I´d be in a situation like the one I mentioned above and that sucked. My life is too short to deal with this idiotic back and forth.

 

 

 

reason 2

Unlike other people, I don´t have that special luck when picking my next reads. I gravitate more towards books that aren´t my cup of tea. It´s not that I´m looking for awful reads. I always pick books I think I´ll like. At some point, I wondered if that´s my calling – To be THAT person who´s supposed to read books that aren´t satisfying. But then I realized I´m just picky. So, unlucky and picky.

When you´re as doomed as I am you really don´t feel the need to continue as were. For me- Something had to stop. Advanced Readers Copies had to go. Now I´m free to only complain about the books I buy.

 

 

 

reason 3

Back in the day, Advanced Readers Copies came in different formats. Paperback, PDF, e-book… I belong to the bunch who received ARC paperbacks, then PDFs…  until e-books took over. I get it. E-books are much more efficient for publishers/authors as well as they are for book bloggers.  I don´t really reach for my Kindle much ( if at all ), so…

ARCs in paperback format are still handed out these days but not as much as before. You´re more likely to receive an e-book copy. Without wanting to come across as ungrateful: I´d rather hold a paperback in my hands. I haven´t warmed up to e-books yet ( and probably never will ).

 

 

 

reason 3.5

That dreadful TBR pile? There´s a special pile for ARCs, too. One hardly any book blogger talks about. Just go hop on over to NetGalley and request a few book titles. The problem with this is: You get blindsided by all the wonderful new titles and request more than you can read. You have to be careful or else you´ll fall into the Netgalley ARC collecting trap.

This has happened to me a few times back in the day and I´m sure it´s still happening to other book bloggers. Luckily- This isn´t a problem for me anymore. No ARCs = No additional unread books. YAY.

 

 

 

reason 4

ARCs come with a policy. When you accept an ARC you´re basically committing to read and then give feedback. Bah. I´m at a stage in life where I´d like to read and review how/when/if I want to. ARCs don´t give me that freedom. I can´t be bothered with giving that kind of commitment anymore.

 

 

 

reason 5

This ARC thing is an exchange, right? And after the exchange, the deed is almost done. Almost. There´s still that social media shout-out ( another exchange ). Of course, this is completely optional but it´s kind of puzzling when a book blogger has invested so much time and effort with the ARC ( reading and giving feedback via chat/review or whatever ) then goes to share on social media and realizes that´s it. Imagine Grandma having 25 grandchildren. Every grandchild calls and leaves a message on the answering machine, including you. Granny calls them all back except you. She doesn´t call back but you keep hearing from your cousins that Granny called and invited everyone over again. This is how it feels when publishers or self-published authors don´t react to the final step on social media.

I mean- No one´s asking for a pajama party, you know? I would understand someone´s reluctance to reply or react if that were the case. To avoid this type of heartache I don´t read ARCs anymore. Not reading ARCs means you don´t have to mention or tag someone for possibly nothing.

 

 

 

reason 6

I have a busy life. I´m not saying I´m the only person who´s super busy but I can say that many book bloggers don´t have the kind of stress I have. ARCs come with demands that don´t fit into my busy schedule anymore. With time I realized that book blogging isn´t only about authors- It´s about book bloggers, too. Author´s think they have a busy schedule? Try talking to a book blogger about life and blogging.

 

 

reason 7

ARC reviews have lost their touch.  7 out of 10 reviews I read start with ” I received an ARC in exchange for…” That´s when I let out a sigh and move on. This is not me disrespecting the reviewer. I would never do that. This is just me feeling tired of having to see this line. Who the hell cares if someone was gifted an ARC in exchange for an opinion? I don´t. As it does NOT add any value to the review I think this doesn´t need to be mentioned at all. I know some publishers and authors ask to be mentioned in reviews… but this doesn’t benefit a reader in any way. Unless we´re all writing our reviews for publishers and authors… But we´re not. We can thank whoever gifted us an ARC privately. I heard emails are still a thing.

 

 

reason 8

The cheaper option. Avid readers have an itch that needs to be dealt with. Books are expensive. ARCs are truly a cheap option when someone is living on a low budget. No one should ever be judged for reading ARCs because they can´t afford to buy books ( no one should be judged PERIOD for not wanting to pay high book prices ). Me? I don´t mind paying for books. I don´t have money growing on trees ( yet, still working on that one ) but I´d rather pay for a book if the price is within reason. I think this can be blamed on a few things:

 

  • I´m not in a hurry. If I see a book I REALLY want I´ll buy it. If I see a book I´m not so sure about, I´ll give myself a few days to think about it. Nothing is running away. This isn´t a book reading race. Does it really matter if I read a book now or later? Nope. Before I commit to ARCs I´d rather wait a few weeks.

 

  • When an author gifts me a copy I´m only supporting them via review. I chose not to go that route because I find reviews only help to a certain degree. I go directly for a book purchase. I´ve been offered ARCs post-publication date but often declined because it was obvious those offers came from authors who thought they needed reviews to generate sales. Those authors weren´t entirely wrong. Although I declined their offers I always said I would rather buy their book. Which I ended up doing. That way, I supported the author AND was able to read & review freely. I know many can´t afford this option but it´s suited me. It still suits me.

 

  • I don´t read THAT much anymore. I used to be able to read 2-3 books in a week. Now I´m lucky if I can find time to read 1 book in 2 weeks. Years ago I wouldn´t have been able to afford to buy that many books. Now? 2-3 books a month isn´t a problem. So, this is, for me, the better option.

 


 

 

Even after all my reasons for not wanting to include ARCs in my life anymore, I can still see the appeal. I mean- who doesn´t want to feel that special something when receiving an ARC? Who doesn´t want to belong to a selected few who´re able to give feedback before everyone else? Edelweiss and NetGalley offer a huge selection of ARCs pre and post-publication date.  But because of all the above, I´d rather pass.

 

On a friendly note: I don´t judge anyone who loves to read ARCs. Advanced Readers Copies are a wonderful thing that make any publisher/author and book blogger happy. With good reason, too. I also don´t judge readers who rely on ARCs because they´re low on extra cash. Whatever works for others is perfectly fine. If it floats your boat then that´s the way it is and should be.

 


 

What about you? Do you read ARCs? How many do you accept per month? What are your experiences with Advanced Readers Copies? Let me know in the comments below. I´d love to chat. ❤

 

Thank you so much for reading this post. I fully appreciate it. I hope you enjoyed.

Much bookish love,

Morgana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Discussion: To “Like” Or To Leave A Comment?

Original source: Dominic Sceski   The Reason Why People “Like” But They Don´t Comment

Where I spotted this post:   author Mel Cusick – Jones blog


 

What do you do after you´ve read a blog post? Do you leave a “like” or do you leave a comment? Do you do both, or are you one of those silent ninjas who just read and move on?

I admit when I saw this post I dropped everything to have a closer read. Because why wouldn´t I want to know what other bloggers believe could be the evil issue behind this like & comment dynamic? It´s interesting… or, let´s just say I find it interesting.

I live for statistics and diagrams ( yes, I´m one of those people ).  I like to take thinks apart and see how things work. But getting down to the nitty gritty of WHY people are more inclined to hit a like button and not comment? That sounds like a year long mission. It might be impossible for someone to figure this complicated issue out. But there might also be an easy answer to all this.

 

Dominic´s post was a joy to read. Straight to the point and informative.  I agree with what he believes are the reasons for why people “like” and not comment. ( If you haven´t already, I recommend reading his post. It´s interesting ) I also believe there´s more to it than the reasons he mentioned.

Dominic has stated that it´s a matter of what makes people comment on a blog post And that would be:

 

A sense of blog personality

 

It´s true that if a blog doesn´t offer some sort of personality a blog post will probably  seem like a robot- cold, clinical, technical…. The people who follow said blog know about the posts but they won´t “know” the blogger if there isn´t something that includes a speck of humanity.

This also applies to blogs / bloggers offering too much personality. As soon as things turn into “me, myself & I”  then they can easily slip into the “they´re so full of themselves” category.

How will anyone be able to comment on someone´s work if they have little or too much personality?

So, it´s about finding a healthy middle way.

 

 

Hmm… But not everyone can do that. Okay- let´s move on.

It doesn´t end there. Having a decent online presence isn´t the only thing you need. A blogger would need to also publish posts people want to read about. There´s a problem with that, though- What is it exactly people want to read about?

 

So, we have two big points that need to be addressed, followed by questions that need answers:

 

  • Have a personality that´s appealing to the general audience
  • Have the content people want to read about  / need

 

Unfortunately, these points open a whole new can of questions.

 

  • How do I know if my personality is appealing or not? 
  • What if I have a great personality?
  • How can I run a personal blog if it doesn´t represent me, myself & I?
  • What if I am up to date with my topics?
  • Is my content less valuable because I´m not publishing what´s needed?
  • What content can I offer that gets people to comment?

 

Tricky, isn´t it? It sure as hell seems like it.

Now here comes the part where I agree with Dominic´s post to some extent:

Yes, having a personality is important. But who´s to say what type of personality works best? Because the world is filled with people, and people. There are young and older book bloggers. Parents and people without children who blog. Introverts and extroverts who type their fingers sore from blogging. All these types of people will most likely have different personalities and life priorities that will  influence their personalities in one way or another. And as it is with bloggers, there are different types of readers. People who seek out certain content that has `hopefully` been written by people who´s personalities speak to them. Because, yes- people feel comfy with others who fit their bill. 

 

In a sense, it´s a matter of liking a personality.

 

Let´s take my sorry self as a totally random example ( because I have no one else at the ass crack of dawn who´ll play guinea pig for me ):

I´m an extrovert. I´m outgoing and love to meet new people. I´m straightforward and I have a take it or leave it attitude. All this will reflect in my posts because that´s just the way I am. There will be people who won´t be able to relate with my posts. There will be people who won´t like my personality because it comes across as too crass. But there will be people who will approve. There will be some who don´t feel intimidated / offended / bored.

And this is where I can answer the first 3 questions from above:

 

  • Your personality, whatever type you have, is appealing. There will always be people who will appreciate the character of your posts. You can be an asshole or a wallflower – You will find your audience. 
  • Maybe it´s not your personality but a slight lack of confidence in specific areas? Say you have a great post, a wonderful personality but your post didn´t end with an invitation for a discussion? 
  • Your blog automatically has a personality when you include your opinion or thoughts. The moment you include “I think.. / I believe.. / In my opinion..” you´re already revealing pieces from yourself. This personal info can be tiny or lengthy but you´re still there. 

 

As for the content:

Unless you´re a gossip blog there will hardly be anything unique you can write about that hasn´t already been seen / read before. We live in a fast moving world where stuff is being published by the minute and all the hype over controversial topics, all discussion posts have already had their shining hour. This should always be remembered when becoming a public figure:

 

The demand is high, but the number of suppliers is higher.

 

Meaning – there is competition. Granted, book blogging is for most a hobby and therefore can´t be considered a rat race ( although some think it´s just that ) but there are more book bloggers out there than you can imagine. It will be impossible to stand out unless someone comes up with a shockingly brilliant marketing idea ( naked bookstagram features, just offering a suggestion. lol ).

For me, the comments and `likes `ratio isn´t a personality problem. It´s more about  “fitting the bill”.

If a blog has over 2000 followers and only a handful are active fans ( the people who leave comments and likes ) then the problem lies more likely with

 

  • the majority only followed in hopes for a follow – back
  • the majority doesn´t spend time reading a blog feed
  • people don´t care
  • the majority is too busy with themselves
  • the majority of followers are silent ninjas: read & move on

 

And all this isn´t terrible because this is how the world works.You can have the best personality ever and have the best blog posts ideas, well written content, etc. and STILL be subjected to a few comments despite your large following.

Also, by working harder ( or by giving your online personality a shift ) to gain more followers  there´s a huge chance you´d only be pushing numbers around.

 

2000 followers = 20 – 40 comments

4000 followers = 40 – 80 comments

 

Of course, I could be wrong. I could also be right. What do I know? I´m just a book blogger trying to figure this whole thing out at  3:25 a.m.

As an experienced book blogger, I can easily say that gaining comments and likes takes time. You have to invest time to find like-minded people who´ll recommend you/your work and invest more time waiting for others to find you. This is easier said than done but it´s possible.

Remember- your content is valuable. Your ideas and thoughts or even your reviews are contributing to the book blogging community. If you´re a book blogger and you´re wondering where the comments from all your 2000 followers are – There´s no need to worry ( unless you purposely shit on someone, then you need to worry ) Book blogging is not about comments or likes ( although it´s nice if they appear ). It´s supposed to bring a book blogger joy or some sort of satisfaction to express themselves and share their thoughts.

As for myself- I love to comment and like on other posts. In some odd way I see commenting as a form of recognition. “Hey, I actually read your post.” is what my comment ( aside from my actual comment ) is saying. A like is quickly given but doesn´t hold as much worth as a comment. But this is just me and my opinion.

Others might not feel comfortable commenting. Others might not feel the need to comment. Who knows. We can´t and never will be able to read people´s minds and win the comment war ( just as authors will never win their review war )

Should you be a blogger who  wants / needs the comments under your posts because you´re on some bookish mission then there are ways to reach that goal. Prepare yourselves to dive deep into the book blogger treasure chest because there´s a whole lot that can help generate comments.


 

How about you? What are your thoughts on why people rather like than comment? Have you experienced this problem? Let me know in the comments below. ❤


 

Thank you for taking your time to read this post. It´s much appreciated.

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