Do You Tag Authors In Negative Reviews?

This post is dedicated to everyone in the book community.

A huge shout out goes to Drew@The Tattooed Book Geek for inspiring me with his post. If you haven´t already be sure to check his thoughts on the subject out right here.

Unfortunately, this to-tag-or-not-to-tag-authors issue has been around for some time now. It pops up on social media and vanishes just as quick as it came. It´s no secret that many authors hate being tagged in review posts on social media. Why? Well, because it´s hurtful. It´s mean. It´s degrading and humiliating. How dare someone put an author on the spot like that.

 

 

That´s what people say. On a few occasions, I´ve seen some authors post something like this on their social media.

“It´s not nice to be tagged in a negative post. Please don´t tag me. It´s rude.”

 

And even some book bloggers will join in and offer their two cents into the mix.

 

„This is NOT okay. Do NOT be cruel by tagging authors in negative reviews.“

 

And I agree to some degree. I agree that you shouldn´t be a hurtful asshat then go off and rub it under an author´s nose. That´s about it, though.

Personally, I don´t see myself siding with the people who believe negativity is harmful. Because I´m the type of person who thinks negativity is necessary. Even if it´s a tag in a post that leads to a negative review. So, to answer the question above:

Yes, I tag authors in negative review posts. And if I´m honest, I don´t really lose a night´s sleep over it, either. I´m okay with sharing my opinions, positive and negative alike, and tagging the people who wrote the books I reviewed online because that´s what I do. That´s my purpose as a book blogger. I´m confident about my work and know that nothing I upload is harmful. Maybe thought-provoking but never harmful. Some book bloggers don´t write negative reviews at all, which is also okay. But I do and I can totally live with myself.

 

Now, before anyone who´s already disagreeing with me or thinking of accusing me of being mean, rude or tactless… Please hear me out because this isn´t meant to be rude or insensitive. This is just my take on the problem. Thank you in advance.

 

After having given this topic lots of thought I´ve come to less than pleasant conclusions as to what the real issues are.

 

#1   Tags are just tags. I think tags can be compared to flies. All´s good until one of those suckers manages to get inside your house and ends up bugging the shit out of you at night when you want to sleep. But, it´s just a fly, you know? That itsy bitsy little flying insect can be dealt with. Well, it´s the same with tags. The negative ones are annoying as well when they appear. Fortunately, tags can be dealt with. Unfortunately, some authors feel the need to lash out on social media. All because of a tag. I admit- this is interesting to see but I can´t help to feel uncomfortable. Why react when you could just deal with it? There´s always time to complain after having tried to iron out the problem.

 

#2   Some authors are spoiled. I know, it sounds so awful but if you think about it, it does make sense. From what I´ve seen, some of the authors who´ve complained about being tagged in negative review posts have been carried on a silver platter for so long by book bloggers they´ve forgotten that negative opinions exist. The end result is: They´ll throw an online tantrum via social media posts and complain about how rude it is to tag their name to a negative post.

 

#3   Some authors are picky. So, it´s okay to tag them in a positive review post but not a negative one. Because that´s what their complain posts say: “Do not tag me in a negative review post. That´s rude.”  Or, am I missing something here? They´ll share/retweet a positive review post but will complain about a negative one. They´re basically rewarding good behavior online and protesting against an opinion they don´t approve of. If authors want feedback, they´ll get feedback. 

 

#4  Negative reviews aren´t always truly negative. I´m sure many can agree with me on this one. There´s a huge difference between wanting to share an opinion and being a cold-hearted bitch on a mission. What helps here is just taking some time off to find out why there was negativity in the first place. If someone has said that the book wasn´t their cup of tea or that they weren´t able to bond with the characters then that can´t be classified as negativity and should be accepted without further ado. Didn´t like what I offered? I´m sorry you feel that way. I hope you´ll find time to check out my other works. I´m sure I have a book you´d like.

 

#5   Authors aren´t the only beings wanting attention. Shocking, I know. It´s hard to believe anyone else wants to make a name for themselves. This point is so damn obvious that it hurts to think about it. There are reasons why a book blogger will tag an author in a negative post.

  1. They want the attention
  2. They want the author to see the review

I can´t fault a book blogger for wanting attention. They have goals just as any author does. What can also come across as a little shocking is: Some book bloggers aren´t working their blogs for authors. They´re doing it for themselves and their followers who rely on their opinions. When they tag an author in a negative review post they´re saying:

“Just dropping by to let you know I read your book. I ended up not liking it.”  And then they move on, allowing an author to check their review out. When this happens they don´t think about an author´s feelings just as an author won´t think about theirs. Is that terrible? I don´t think it is.

 

#6   Feelings. Some authors will not hold back and share their feelings. “Just stop and think about how this makes me feel.”   * nod *  * shaking head * Without wanting to sound like a complete bitch- Book bloggers should be mindful at all times? Book bloggers need to be considerate AND careful not to put a dent in a book´s reputation? This is asking for the impossible. Look, this whole thing is basically an exchange. Author publishes a book and book blogger/reviewer leaves a review.  Not every book blogger can puke rainbows for everyone. Many reviewers aren´t interested in walking on eggshells. 

 

#7   It´s about the book, not the author. This point can be tied with #4. Some authors fail to recognize that they´re selling a product. If someone doesn´t like the product they´re going to complain to the manufacturer. In most cases, that´s exactly what a book blogger is doing- letting the author know what they thought via social media tag.  But authors take this personally because the books they´ve written are often considered to be their “babies”.

 

So, what´s the real problem here? Is it the review, the reviewer/book blogger or the tag? Or perhaps it´s an author?

 

The core of this evil is a combination of all four. Without the reviewer, there wouldn´t be a negative review and without both and social media there wouldn´t be a tag. And without some authors, there wouldn´t be complaints. Sounds like we could all be living wonderfully quiet lives, huh?

 

After having been a part of the book universe for so long I´ve learned that whatever you do, things won´t ever play out the way you want them to. You, as a book blogger, will always be judged. Your blog will always be judged. Your opinions and posts will be judged. You can be as fake or as genuine as you like- your critique ( no matter how mild or diplomatic ) will not be accepted.  The same applies to authors: No matter what you write about there will always be people who´ll have strong opinions. You can´t keep away the hate. You can´t avoid a tag. You can´t prevent tags in negative review posts from happening. A post about it will not convince someone to stop.

 

Of course- all this is worthless when an author comes across a bitch on a mission. The book bloggers who are hateful and personal should rethink their blog philosophy and work on their social skills. Just as sensitive/stubborn authors who´re constantly offended by everything that´s not a praise should.

 

This is a community. We´re in it for a reason. We need each other to exist. Book bloggers depend on books to read and review and authors need readers and reviews. As annoying as negative tags are for authors, there not worth the fuss. Because in the end- It´s a tag.

So you see, there´s no win/win situation here.  * sigh *

The key is to be civilized. If we can´t act in a civilized manner then we need to step away and breathe.

 

On a friendly note: As stated above- None of this is meant to hurt someone. I´m not pointing fingers at anyone in particular. I´m only sharing my observations. I´m positive many will disagree with me on this subject and some will actually agree.

On an even friendlier note: Remember- It´s okay. If you´re a book blogger who does or doesn´t share negative reviews on social media then you´re okay. You´re not going against any rules because there aren´t any. It´s also okay to tag authors in positive and negative review posts, as long as you´re being civilized, no harm is done. Always keep in mind that just because someone doesn´t approve doesn´t mean you´re doing something wrong. Tag authors. Give them feedback. Let them know you exist.

 


 

I´m afraid to ask: What about you? Do you care enough about this topic to chat about it? Do you tag authors in negative review posts? Let me know in the comments below. I´d love to chat. 

 


 

Thank you for taking the time to read this post. I hope you enjoyed. And if you didn´t then that´s okay.

I hope you all have a wonderful day.

Take care,

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Is There An Easier Way To Review Books?

I´ll tell you what – I struggle sometimes with writing reviews. There are days when I can sit down and write a colorful 2K word review for a 300 page standalone. Then I go through phases of painful reviewer´s block. I can´t come up with the right words to express my thoughts or feelings regarding a book.

You´d think I´d have the hang of this review thingy by now. I mean- 10 years should have taught me a trick or two. Weeeeell, it seems like I´m still winging things as I go.

My biggest struggle is review size/length. For some reason, I have this notion that reviews have to be a certain size to be considered a true review. I know, total bullshit. But I can´t help it. It´s like this evil pattern embedded deep in the recesses of my brain. Am I bothered by this? To be honest- Sometimes I am. Writing reviews should be as easy as breathing in air. All you have to do is lay down your opinion and hit that publish button. * sigh *  If only that were true.
During my book blogger years I´ve asked myself the same questions over and over again:

  • Is there an easier way to review books?
  • Should my reviews be lengthy or short?
  • If short, how short? If long, how high should my word count be?

 

This isn´t a matter of being insecure. This is me battling my perfectionist side. Thankfully, I´ve learned that book review size doesn´t really matter.

 

Review length is a matter of personal preference. 

 

It´s a question of how much information a reviewer wants to include in their reviews. Personality, style, emotions, and knowledge. Add all or only add a few. Do whatever the hell you want, right? Right. But there was still one question left unanswered. One I consider a challenge.

Is there an easier way to review books?

Because let´s face it – No one is able to pull a review out of their ass thinking hat. It´s tedious sometimes. And us foot folk don´t get paid for our awesomeness. There has to be a way!

The other day I was making notes in my reading log for my next review when I noticed a little box on the lower left corner. A little feature I have been using all along but never gave much thought about.

smiley

 

A simple rating system. Rate the plot, the characters, and ease of reading. Then to sum everything up you give your overall opinion via smiley.  This doesn´t even take a minute out of our day ( if we allow ourselves to not overthink much and analyze everything ) to do and can also be easily used as book reviews. If you ask me, I think this is brilliant. I´ll tell you why:

  • Some people misunderstand reviews. I know- Unthinkable but true. Some reviews are very wordy and not everyone´s native speaking language is English. I can see why some would have questions.
  • They´re wordless. Sometimes words can hurt. Whether intentionally or unintentionally… there´s bound to be an author hanging on that one word a reviewer used to describe the book/their feelings.
  • Most of the world is familiar with a smiley rating scale– Everyone´s most likely been confronted with a 3 point or 5 point rating scale at a young age so there is a global understanding of what a sad face, a neutral face and a happy face means.
  • They´re quick. Some people take days to write a review. Imagine how much time could be saved by using this system. This would give reviews a whole new meaning and reviewers the chance not to dwell on sentence structure, repetitive words, etc. Plus, using smileys saves time. We live in a fast-moving environment where many of us don´t have enough hours in our day to get things done.
  • They´re spoiler – free. I know many people who don´t read reviews out of fear of bumping into a spoiler. You could avoid any minor or major spoiler by using the smiley rating system.

 

Sounds wonderful, doesn´t it?  For a book blogger, sure. Of course, there´s always a flip side to brilliant things. This system might work wonders but it´s entirely reviewer friendly. We save time. We hardly have work with a review. But what about the consumer? The people who depend or rely on reviews? Future book spoilers aren´t a problem with this system but what about the emotional aspect? That slight push that seals the book purchase deal? Smileys can´t give a reader authenticity. They symbolize emotions. They don´t glow with personality.

So, I guess the idea of using this quick book blogger friendly rating system as reviews is out of the question, huh? Still, wouldn´t it be nice? In an ideal world, we´d be able to use this system AND help the consumer. Sounds so good.

 

Since we don´t live in a perfect world I might as well change the question to:

Is there a more efficient way to write a review that still helps the consumer?

Hmm… Here´s to 10 more years of coming up with an answer!

OR (!!!) I might just test this all out and see how it´s received. Hmm….


 

Let´s chat: What are your thoughts on review size? Which do you prefer to read: long or short reviews? What´s your take on the smileys? I would love to read your thoughts!

 


 

As always, thank you so much for reading. I hope you enjoyed.

 

XO´s

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The Problem With Honest Book Reviews From Book Bloggers

There´s a problem with honest book reviews from book bloggers. Did you know about that? Have you already figured out what the problem is? It´s tiny, almost miniscule microscopic, but it´s still there. I´m even positive this problem doesn´t even bother anyone, either.

Honesty. Probably one of the trickiest and most misunderstood word existing. We all want honesty but it´s often not accepted or appreciated, depending on the type of honesty that´s been given. Negative honesty is never welcomed. Positive honesty is always appreciated.

But what about the unnecessary type of honesty? Like- the mentioning of honesty in book reviews?

 

In the ever growing book industry, book bloggers / readers are confronted with writers from every bookish corner. We´ve got the indie writers, the self – published authors and the traditional published authors. And every single one of those writers, no matter the niche they occupy or the genre they write in,.. they all  need feedback ( as I´ve so cleverly mentioned in my post on 5 Reasons Why Book Reviews Are Important.) Feedback usually comes from readers. But that´s a whole other bedtime story for another night. ( and some day I will get to how opinions affect authors ) And they all want honest opinions. Okay, fair enough, right? Shouldn´t be that difficult to accomplish. In fact, this should be the easiest part of a book blogger´s job. Yet….. there´s a problem. A weird one.

 

Ever picked a review to read and noticed how those reviewers include a

“this is my honest opinion”

line? Whether that line is on the top of a review or skillfully weaved into a review… Reviewers often ( if not always ) add that line or use the words honest opinion.

Isn´t that just fabulous? Everyday, indecisive readers get to read an honest opinion on a book. If you take a few seconds to think about it… Mentioning  honesty isn´t really necessary because it should go without saying that the review on any book is honest. Why bother, otherwise, right?

But the word holds more power than one would think. Honesty. Because we get blindsided about the actual fact and meaning.

“Oh wow! We´re getting an honest opinion.”

When in reality, you´re getting one person´s point of view. It´s their honesty. No one elses. It´s not the honesty above all honesty.

It´s irrelivant to include “This is my honest opinion.” because I, myself, assume I´m getting an honest opinion anyway. That was my honest opinion right there.

But for a book blogger to include such info? Can someone see where I´m going with this? It´s confusing.

I have yet to come across a book blogger who went out of their way to lie in their reviews.

Okay – If we leave out the special people who review books they haven´t read ( yes, dear book – loving – Padawans. That´s a thing. And these people can be spotted easily ) then there´s no reason not to think a review isn´t always honest.

I agree with you all that this isn´t world shattering business but it´s still something to think about.

Dear book bloggers, why do you add that line? Is it because you want to prevent a war? Is it because maybe you feel better including the honesty disclaimer? Why do you do it, if you do it at all?

 

Maybe it´s because book bloggers have been asked by publishers or authors to include the honesty bit in reviews…. Which is fine. Doesn´t mean it makes more sense to me because ( see reasons above ) it still doesn´t make sense ( does this make sense?!).

So, there´s my answer to the problem. Including an honesty line doesn´t carry much meaning.

I would love to read your thoughts on the subject Honest Opinions In Reviews!<3

 

Thank you all for reading this blog post.

PS: In no way was I trying to be offensive to fellow book bloggers who include the honesty line in their reviews.

Much love,

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Why Star Ratings Are Frowned Upon

You´re probably thinking: “Wait. What? Star ratings for books are frowned upon?”

It´s true. The book universe has changed and with it the book ratings, as well.

Gone are the days where book bloggers express their powerful opinions in form of a skillful rant. Vanished are the times when people were brave enough to just say what they wanted, how they wanted ( in a respectful manner, of course ).

We´ve entered the age of warning labels and controlled speech. Because it´s not nice to say what´s really on your mind. Even if your opinion isn´t harmful… there´s always a little booger  someone who feels offended, mistreated or hurt.

These days, books have trigger warnings and reviews have no star ratings. Why? Well, I think it´s clear as to why certain books have warning labels. But why are reviewers ditching the star ratings? I´ve come up with a few ideas as to WHY.

  • They make no sense to the reviewer / they don´t believe in the system
  • They´re harmful and can influence a reader
  • They´re impolite

Yes. Book reviews with star ratings are frowned upon. But, says who? I could say say the people who´re over sensitive” but that would be hurtful of me. And I´m not out to point fingers at any particular group of emotionally charged people. Not today.

Some time a while back I´ve witnessed the slow death of the star ratings. Book bloggers started changing their review formats. Okay.

But what I also noticed was- Without the ratings I didn´t have a definite idea on what the reviewer was saying.

Because reviews have become modern riddles. “I loved everything about this book” and they go and leave a list of negatives “I didn´t really like this and that about this book.” All in one review without any type of rating or even a recommendation line.  And in the end, I´m sitting here wondering if the reviewer liked the book or not.

 

 

Aren´t reviews supposed to help a reader? Isn´t that why people search for book reviews ( or reviews for any product )? They want to read an opinion and see if that person would recommend a book or not. With an opinion consisting of 50% love gushing and 50% negative feedback… am I supposed to sniff out the 2, 3, or 4 stars on my own?

With that being said- Not all book reviews are confusing as hell. There are a few reviews without star ratings that give a clear idea on what the reviewer wants to say. Others, though? *  holding breath  *

So, why do reviewers frown upon star ratings?

I might lack the energy of doing a full blown research party on the topic but I don´t lack observation skills. And what I´ve observed is quite unsettling.

It´s not necessarily the reviewers fault that the star ratings have disappeared. It´s often times the combination of authors, trends and the reviewers.

In my almost 9 years of book blogging I´ve learned ( the hard way, mind you ) that many authors are slightly sensitive. One negative opinion could result in a public emotional outburst. Reviewers can be just as sensitive but on a different level ( that´s a new bedtime story I´ll tackle in the near future ).

This is something I´ve repeatedly seen in the almost 9 years of book blogging:

  • Author receives 1, 2, 3 star review
  • Author throws an online fit and even threatens to kick bloggers off their A – list / and will definitely avoid said bloggers and even warn others of a supposedly negative reviewer
  • Book blogger thinks of ways to express themselves and still stay in an author´s good graces
  • Book blogger decides to wash their opinions in unicorn glitter and ditch the star ratings
  • Author is confused about the positive & negative review ( because one little “I didn´t like..” will be seen as negative feedback ) but keeps book blogger on the A-list

 

Clever, right? * sigh * It´s not, really. It´s just a way to pacify a moody artist and still keep up a decent online reputation. This is a cycle among bloggers and authors ( not every blogger and author, mind you )

Star ratings only make sense when it´s a 3, 4 or 5 star rating. Anything below 3 stars is just not acceptable. Because why be THAT person and shit on something by giving it 1, 2 or possibly a negative 3 stars? Believe it or not… that´s how 1, 2 or even 3 star ratings are seen. As negative negativity no one wants. No one wants to be associated with negativity.

Living in the “Thou shalt not offend” era certainly makes reviews more interesting as well. Reviews have to be worded correctly, preferably without including a star rating or else….

It´s a trend. One that will hopefully pass soon because these neutral opinions aren´t really working. The reality is: We do not live in a world made of sugar. The key is to be respectful. If someone else can´t live with that then that´s for them to deal with.

I think what the real problem is ( and always will be )…

It´s about the product and not the person behind the product.

Authors fail to see that a reviewer´s opinion isn´t a personal attack just as reviewers fail to realize that they´re not going to hell if they just be more specific in their reviews.

And by specific I mean include either a definite opinion or re – include a star rating in their reviews.

So, like everything else in life, star rating – less reviews are a trend fired off by moody artists and careful book bloggers in a time of political correctness.

As for my own raw opinion on the subject: I like star ratings and like to include them in my reviews. I also highly appreciate reading reviews with star ratings because they help give that final conclusion on the reviewers thoughts. Stars ( doesn´t matter if 1 or 5 stars ) help me understand a reviewer. I also like to believe that my adding star ratings helps my followers.

NOTE: No trigger warning label needed for this post. This is an opinion friendly blog. All respectful opinions regarding the subject are welcomed and will be treated with the same respect in return. ❤ 


Do you agree? Or do you perhaps disagree? How about we agree to disagree? I would love to find out what you think about reviews without star ratings! Do they bother you not? Have you even noticed missing star ratings? Let´s chat. ❤  


Thank you so much for reading. ❤

Sending out much love and positive vibes,

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Do I Need A Domain For My Book Blog?

To have a domain, or not to have a domain…. A question quite a few book bloggers ask themselves either before or during their blog career. But the real question should be-

Do I Need A Domain For My Book Blog?

Is a domain necessary to maintain a book blog? Normally, my answer would be a shoulder shrug. Because I truly have no flippin´ clue if a book blogger actually needs a domain or not. But since I´m feeling like a wise and overly clever chica tonight ( I just finished a game of Trivia Pursuit. I´m feeling the genius vibes because I won!  ) I´m going to give a glowing breakdown on the issue Book Blog and Domain.

Let´s start with some basic info. Don´t worry. This won´t be a tech savvy´s dream come true. I´ll keep this as simple as possible for those who are a lot like me. I´m glad I can open my laptop up and starting it without crying.


What Is  A Domain? And What Does It Do?

There will never be an easier answer than this. See that part at the top of your browser window? The URL bar? Where it says http://&#8230;. The name after that is the domain name. If you´re still reading this and haven´t passed out from sheer boredom yet you´ll see morganasbookbox.wordpress.com.

Why is WordPress built in my blog URL? Because my blog is hosted by WordPress and I´m too cheap to get rid of it ( God, that felt so good to type out ).

As far as the functionality of a domain name goes – A domain name is your unique identity. It represents you / your business, your purpose on the internet. It gives you an overall cleaner and more professional appearance.

Makes sense, right? If you want to look professional with a unique name and not have a host name attached, then getting a domain is the way to go.

Oh, and the major bonus from a having a domain? By securing a domain, it´s yours to have and to hold ( unless you cancel it. Then you give others the opportunity to be the next chicichaca.com )

But the true question remains: Is it necessary for a book blog to have a domain? We´ll get to that in a bit. First let´s do a super quick recap on what a book blogger is ( I promise… this´ll be super bitch quick )


 

A Book Blogger´s Sole Purpose

We´ve chewed this topic through and through and still… it never hurts to remind people of the badass – ness minions who work the book mill ( SHOUT OUT TO ALL  BOOK BLOGGERS! You´re awesome. Love you ).

The short version: A book blogger reads, reviews and publishes those reviews online ( among many other things ). Either on a personal blog or a website or on any other already existing platform. It´s a hobby for most. And like most hobbies – you can´t live off of it. It´s time consuming and taxing.

Now for the long version: If you´re interested in finding out what a book blogger´s sole purpose in life is I advise you try reading What Does A Book Blogger Do? 

Let´s just say we deserve all the chocolate and flowers in the world. ( emphasis is on chocolate… Just saying. Hit me up on Twitter for further details. No Hershey´s, please )

Back to that question: Does a book blogger who hobby blogs need a domain? Not quite sure, yet.


 

Since we´ve got the basics down we might as well do a pros and cons list of what a book blogger is with a domain and what a book blogger is without one ( not including personal plans and offers from different platform hosts ). Is there a difference? Does a domain matter? Let´s compare…

Pros of having a domain as a book blogger

  • you get to have a unique web name without added mush in the address
  • your URL looks more professional / clean
  • you reserve that name for yourself / your brand / your business / your purpose
  • People will likely have less difficulty finding you

 

Cons of having a domain as a book blogger

  • a domain costs money

 

Pros of not having a domain as a book blogger

  • no domain – no costs

 

Cons of not having a domain as a book blogger

  • Your web address looks butchered and stitched up, leaving you with an impossible appearance
  • chances are slightly high that someone else with the same name idea will get a domain and snatch that domain from you, forcing you to get something you didn´t want. e.g.  What I wanted: http://www.morganasbookbox.com What I´ll be forced to use: http://www.morganasbutcheredbookbox.com
  • A unique name / address is easier to remember than having a big ass Tolstoy address.

 

All in all, having a domain does seem like the better option. But for a hobby? I´m not sure.


 

It´s best to say getting a domain depends on what a book blogger has in mind for their blog / their blog´s future.

  • What type of book blogger do I want to be? A just for fun type or go all pro?
  • Is my book blog for personal use only or am I creating a brand?
  • Do I want a domain or do I need one?
  • Is my blog name unique enough for me to go without a domain?

Because let´s face it… If you name your book blog Julia´s Book Blog.. chances are pretty high that another book blogger had the same genius idea. Maybe a few Julia´s had the same clever thought. How awkward.

Have fun trying to find the right Julia blog, then. In this case, I´d highly recommend a new blog name or a domain. Or both. Can´t have another Faleena Hopkins ( and her trademark escapade ) happening again.

 

Personally, I believe if a book blogger sees their blog – job as a hobby then there´s no need for a domain. But if a book blogger wants more out of their hobby and does take their internet doings a tad more serious,… then a domain wouldn´t hurt.

Of course, all this is a matter of personal preference. And yes, many more factors play a role in trying to figure out if or if not someone should secure a domain for their blog.

You might not be interested but I´m going to reveal my personal experiences with you anyways…

I used to have a domain and I still do have some ( don´t ask. It´s complicated ). For my Morgana´s Book Box blog I removed my domain because I think the name is unique enough and strong enough on it´s own. No one, not even a little hacker beast will ever think of reserving the domains I gave free. Because who wants to use Morgana? I guarantee you… no one does. Besides, this is a hobby and I don´t have enough energy or time to go pro again. I´m only in for the fun and letting off some steam. A domain would only look clean and I don´t even have the energy to care about that, either.

Should anyone ever snag the domain for Morgana´s Book Box then there are ways to alter the blog name. And I´m not opposed to changing the name, either. I see this whole thing pretty laid back.

 

Now, to the big question again… Is a domain necessary for a book blogger? Yes and no. It depends on you and your personal goals.


What are your thoughts on domains for book bloggers? Let´s chat. 

Thank you all for reading. Share the book love.

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