That´s Bookish Interesting- A Book Trigger Warning Site

When people ask me what´s it like to be in the book blog community I always give the same answer:

It´s interesting.

Because it is. Sure, it´s great fun to mingle with the book crowd and read/review and “research” on social media…  There´s always something new happening in the book blog universe. Just recently I stumbled upon something that caught my bookish attention. A site called Book Trigger Warnings.

Book Trigger Warnings is a site that´s dedicated to readers who´re looking for `safe` books to read.

Aah, okay.

 

 

In theory, not a bad idea. Some readers are sensitive / get triggered when reading potentially distressing material. Also, this idea offers insensitive readers, who´re looking for specific triggering elements, a way to feed their needs. The site can be seen as a win/win for both reader parties. 

In practice, though… This won´t be a simple thing to manage. Especially in a world where close to everything can be considered a trigger.

I won´t lie- I have mixed feelings about this site or any other site that promises `safe` options. I also don´t see the word `safe` anywhere near books. I can´t say I´ve met an author whose first priority was to write a safe book.

I accept a reader´s wish to want to read books that won´t trigger them. But where does the trigger list start and end?

Another concern of mine is: Most books already have trigger warnings. These are often included in online book descriptions ( either provided by a publisher or author ) or inside books. To include more trigger warnings would mean to reveal more information about the story. From my point of view, this means we´re moving further away from trigger warnings and closer toward spoilers. Not that I have anything against spoilers ( spoiler fan here ) but there are people who´ll literally threaten others if they mention more than what´s been printed on the backside of a book.

 

 

I can´t help but think about what book trigger warning sites do for authors / self-published authors ( or won´t do ). It´s no secret that most are already struggling with the trigger topic. Because trigger warnings influence sales.

 

  • Add no trigger warnings = Some readers could get triggered
  • Add a few warnings = Some readers will be triggered 
  • Add a generalized warning = Some readers will be triggered
  • Add any/all potential topic as a warning = Some readers will be triggered

 

A triggered reader will most likely leave a negative review. Negative reviews have the power to persuade potential buyers. So, an author is convinced they have to include trigger warnings for their books to not jeopardize their book sales. So far so good. But what if I told you that half of the triggered population isn´t genuinely triggered? Maybe they just don´t approve of certain elements in stories and demand to be warned?

The bottom line of all the points mentioned above is: Whatever happens, there will be triggered people. And there will be negative reviews. These can´t be avoided no matter what.

I applaud the people managing Book Trigger Warnings and wanting to provide safe reading experiences for their followers. It’s a genuine concept that targets a certain crowd. But I´m having a hard time wrapping my head around this topic.

We´re living in a world where people aren´t satisfied with walking away from something they don´t enjoy/like/approve of. The sole purpose of a book has always been to educate and entertain readers. By creating lists with `safe` reading options we´re helping readers stay in their comfort zones and unconsciously pressuring self-published authors to rethink their ideas for their future stories/to work harder on including the right trigger warnings.

Non-fiction can be a challenging genre for some readers. For readers who genuinely become emotionally distressed- I think the Book Trigger Warnings site could be helpful. It could also work the other way around for readers who live for emotional wreckage. But I truly believe many will misuse the site and that will take its toll on the publishing and self-publishing world.

Of course, I could be completely wrong about this topic. But then again, there is no right or wrong when it comes to trigger warnings. It all depends on the individual reader.

Despite my mixed feelings, I wish Book Trigger Warnings all the success, love, and chocolate cake in the world. May their site be as helpful as they hope it will be.

 


What are your thoughts? Feel free to leave a comment if you agree or disagree. ❤


Sending everyone lots of book love!

Have a wonderful day,

Book Review: The Queen´s Assassin – Melissa De La Cruz

Caledon Holt is the Kingdom of Renovia’s deadliest weapon. No one alive can best him in brawn or brains, which is why he’s the Guild’s most dangerous member and the Queen’s one and only assassin. He’s also bound to the Queen by an impossible vow–to find the missing Deian Scrolls, the fount of all magical history and knowledge, stolen years ago by a nefarious sect called the Aphrasians.

Shadow has been training all her life to follow in the footsteps of her mother and aunts–to become skilled enough to join the ranks of the Guild. Though magic has been forbidden since the Aphrasian uprising, Shadow has been learning to control her powers in secret, hoping that one day she’ll become an assassin as feared and revered as Caledon Holt.

When a surprise attack brings Shadow and Cal together, they’re forced to team up as assassin and apprentice to hunt down a new sinister threat to Renovia. But as Cal and Shadow grow closer, they’ll uncover a shocking web of lies and secrets that may destroy everything they hold dear. With war on the horizon and true love at risk, they’ll stop at nothing to protect each other and their kingdom in this stunning first novel in the Queen’s Secret series.

 


 

The Queen´s Assassin ( The Queen´s Secret ) by Melissa De La Cruz is a fantasy gone bone dry.

Think of being served an overcooked turkey and having to eat that without drinking a sip of water during or after- That´s how this book felt.

` Bound by fate… Broken by love. `

The tagline on the front cover sounds cheesy as hell but that´s exactly what I was looking for. A fantasy romance with a bit of abracadabra or voodoo majoojoo that would ruin my emotional household. So, I bought it and… fell asleep after a few pages.

The next day I gave it another go. I fell asleep again. It took me a full week to finish The Queen´s Assassin because it was so sober. So dry. So utterly matter of fact. Not the multifaceted story I imagined it would be. It´s never a good sign when I fall asleep so often when wanting to read a book.

With that being said, I didn´t like the writing. I liked how the story started and I loved the world build but not how the story was told. The exciting moments weren´t exciting. The drama wasn´t dramatic. The romance wasn´t there. The mysterious parts weren´t gripping. The big reveal at the end didn´t faze me one bit.


Would I recommend this book? Not if you´re looking for something that´ll knock your fantasy romance world.

Will I continue the series? Nope.


The Cover – 3 Stars: It´s decent. Nothing special.

The Story – 2 Stars: Less adventurous than promised. Less gripping than I thought it would be. Plus, the writing did nothing for me.

The Characters – 2 Stars: Both did nothing for me as individual figures or as a couple.

My emotional state after finishing this book – Ready to move on.

 


This book is available online on Amazon.com

The Art Of Pronouncing Book Character Names

Book character names– You just gotta love them. Even the ones you´re not sure how to pronounce.

As avid readers we´re often confronted with characters who have standard names. Whether they´re gender-specific names or gender-neutral… a reader has a good chance at pronouncing a book character´s name correctly. I mean, it´s hard to verbally butcher Dylan, Michael, Daniel, Gabriel, Cole or Samantha, Jessica, and Mathilda.

But then we discover a book that has characters who don´t have standard names. That´s when things can become tricky for a reader.

I´ll admit that I belong to those people who have problems pronouncing unique names, especially when reading fantasy. Usually, I just go along with whatever pronunciation I come up with and continue reading. My mental pronunciation of a character´s name is final no matter how often others try to correct me. I can´t help it. It´s like I´ve set my version of a name in stone.

 

Let the mental name pronunciation games begin ( and end )!

Fantasy authors love to give their characters that extra something. That particular sprinkle of special to make him/her/it stand out from all the others. They could be bold and fierce, beautiful, and deadly… They could kill demons and stare into Medusa´s eyes without turning to stone. That someone can´t be named Jimmy or Candy ( apologies to all the Jimmys and Candys IRL. Y´all are awesome in your own right ). The deadly warrior has to have a name that lives up to their reputation. They need a name that´s unique. So, what some authors will do is either take an existing name and tinker with that or they´ll play around with the alphabet- Creating names 50% of the reading population can´t pronounce.

From what I´ve seen, many of these difficult names often have the letters Y and H in them. Not to forget the hyphens, tildes, a slashed O, and sometimes an umlaut. For anyone who isn´t familiar with these letters or special characters ( for lack of a better term ), any name would be hard to pronounce correctly. It´s a challenge.

But do not fear! Not all authors leave their readers clueless. Some authors have pity with their readers. Some books have a pronunciation guide. Personally, I find this semi helpful. Most books include this little addition in the last few pages. Meaning: when the story has already been read. This means a reader who was unsure about a name spent 2-7 days mentally pronouncing a name wrong. The books that have a pronunciation guide in the first few pages are more helpful.

Unique Names Aren´t Tied To One Genre Only

Unfortunately, the fantasy genre isn´t the only genre that has difficult to pronounce names. We see this happen in romance, YA, historical, etc. Names can sometimes match the setting of a story. If a story takes place in Norway then I do kind of expect to see typical Norwegian or Norse names. For me, there´s no greater challenge than trying to pronounce a Gaelic or Norse name, especially when authors pick the most difficult name known in the history of names. The tongue twisters. The names even the natives can´t pronounce correctly. These names often leave me with no other choice than to come up with another name for the character.

Yes, I´ve occasionally given characters that had difficult to pronounce names other names. I´ve done this mostly because I was fed up with the guessing game.

Feyre, the main character from Sarah J. Maas´s A Court Of Thorns And Roses quickly became Fey. Just Fey. Feyre could be pronounced Fire-re or Fairie, right? The correct pronunciation, though, is Fay-ruh.

Laoghaire, a character from Diana Gabaldon´s Outlander, became Longhair. How was I supposed to know the correct pronunciation is Leery? Laoghaire looks more like Longhair than anything else. I´ve been calling that character Longhair ever since ( and funnily enough, no one has corrected me ).

It´s understandable why many authors decide on odd/unique/special/ancient/made-up names for their characters. These names aren´t easy to forget. They leave a lasting impression. Of course, this leaves me with a whole lot of questions for authors. Questions that´ll most likely stay unanswered. But that´s okay. I don´t really need to know why some names exist. I also don´t need to know if authors expect their readers to come up with the correct pronunciation from the get-go. Still, I wonder….

So, what´s the best way to go about this issue? I have no clue. I´ll stick with doing what I´ve always done.


What about you? Can you relate? Do you occasionally have problems pronouncing book character names? Which name has been the most difficult to pronounce? Let me know in the comments below. I´d love to chat. ❤


Thank you for reading my blog post. I totally appreciate it.

Feel hugged,

Spam Box Treasures: May ´20

If you thought April´s Spam Box Treasures edition was weird then there´s no telling what May´s edition is. I had a blast going through these. They´re so multifaceted.


#1 – Hey! Whatchu have against newspapers?

#2 – Dear cousin,

I always recognize such exact trouble about you.

#3 – Hackers? No. But I do have issues with Spammers. 

#4 – Va t´en  s ´il te plait.

#5 – Say what? Are you trying to get me interested in cheap soccer gear for kids?

#6 – FINALLY A SPAM COMMENT ABOUT BLOG!

#7 – * fondly remembering the days I never wrote AOL articles* 

#8 – What annoys me is that you won´t “probably be back to get more”. You´ll definitely be back, blog3006. You left me a truckload of spam comments all month. 

#9 – I can hardly help myself, blog3004.xyz! What makes you think I could help you with your blog issues?


Puuh! What an exhausting Spam Box month. Still, I hope you enjoyed ❤

Be sure to stay tuned for June´s Spam Box Treasure edition.

Have a lovely day.

Much bookish love,

10 Bookish Memes That Will Brighten Your Day

What would our small book universe be without bookish memes? Probably only half as great.

The bookish memes below are what I would classify as “It´s funny ’cause it´s true.” because… well, they hit so close to home ( don´t all book memes? ). They express moments we´ve either felt, thought, or lived through.

Alas, here are my 10 favorite bookish Memes that´ll hopefully brighten your day.

#1 That Dreadful Moment...

#2 Word.

#3 Marie, who hurt you?!

#4 Naaw, the good old days.

#5 The pain is real, folks.

#6 YES!

#7 They forgot the re-read option.

#8 Sometimes it´s the combination of reading all night and wine.

#9 I know the feeling.

#10 But ONLY just in case.


Out of all 10 memes #5 is my all time favorite.

What about you? Which of these bookish memes can you most relate to? Let me know in the comments below. I´d love to chat ❤


Thank you for reading this blog post. I hope you enjoyed.

Much bookish love,